Tag Archives: namibia

Rust imagines Twyfelfontein in Sweden

By Martha Mukaiwa for The Namibian Newspaper (copied here with kind permission)

and further down: an interview with Johan Adeström published in Söderhamns Kurieren (translated to English via the internet and copied here with kind permission.

Imke Rust in her art installation ‘Drawing Certainty from the Spring of Doubt’, at Erik-Anders Farm, Asta, Sweden

IN a once derelict hut in Sweden, award-winning multidisciplinary artist Imke Rust draws the spirit of Twyfelfontein across space and time.

Her installation which connects the decorated farmhouses of Hälsingland and the famed site of ancient rock engravings in northern Namibia was created for this year’s World Heritage Scholarship.

Rust was awarded the residency from a crop of 101 applicants from 34 countries and spent four weeks living and working at Sweden’s Hälsingegården Erik-Anders and Kristofers Farm.

The scholarship invited artists to connect the aspirational and elaborately hand-painted farmhouses of Hälsingland with another Unesco World Heritage site and Rust quickly saw a link with the rock engravings of Twyfelfontein, some of which, like ‘Lion Man’ and ‘Dancing Kudu’, are said to depict shamanic rituals and trances.

“Both sites are not ‘mere decorations’ but are intentional creative interventions, which allow us to transcend into an alternative reality,” she says.

Transforming the hut into a fairy tale-like space by painting wallpaper in the style of the decorated Hälsingland farms while referencing Twyfelfontein in images rendered akin to the famed rock engravings, Rust engaged in a highly intuitive process that combined found natural and man-made objects with retro telephone book pages which culminate in an installation she titled ‘Drawing Certainty from the Spring of Doubt’.

Though the installation is in Sweden and draws on Twyfelfontein, Rust maintains that neither becomes the other.

“The installation creates a room where both sites are in correspondence with each other, without imposing one on the other. Correspondence is an open-ended, dialogical process of unfolding and becoming,” she says.

To Rust, this straddling and correspondence between realities, cultures, time and space, provides a unique opportunity for learning and connection.

“Maybe a bit like eavesdropping on a conversation between the two sites and making up your own story from the elements you recognise and the ones which seem strange and unfamiliar. Or like stumbling into an unknown cave and finding more and more treasures as you look, but not fully understanding them.”

Honoured to have her installation supported and on show at the Erik-Anders World Heritage site which receives around 30 000 visitors per year, Rust left Sweden with the feeling of having highlighted our shared humanness.

“One of the central ideas of my art and installation is to show how humans are much more alike than different,” Rust says.

“We marvel at the ‘other’ and how exotic they are, but once we look a bit closer, we can realise that we all have the same needs, hopes and fears.”

Visit imkerust.com to explore the installation online.

–martha@namibian.com.na; Martha Mukaiwa on Facebook and Instagram; marthamukaiwa.com

See more images and info HERE.

Interview:

International artist weaves together world heritage from Africa and Hälsingland: “Feeling a bit like a curious child”

What do artistic elements in Hälsingland farms have in common with rock carvings from a world heritage site in Namibia?

“Quite a lot”, says the acclaimed Namibian artist Imke Rust, who for a month worked on an art project at Erik-Andersgården in Söderala.

This is the third time that the World Heritage Scholarship has been awarded by the Gävleborg Region. This year, the Namibian artist Imke Rust has received 5,000 euros to create art where two world heritage sites are linked: Twyfelfontein, an area with rock engravings in Namibia and Erik-Andersgården in Söderala.

This year, more than a hundred applications were received from 34 different countries, but the jury stuck to Imke Rust’s application.

She was born and raised in the Namibian capital Windhoek and has on two occasions received the country’s finest art award from the Namibian national art gallery. Nowadays she lives mostly in Germany.

The visit to Sweden is her first, and she did not know much about the country.

– I had an image that it is a well-ordered country far north, with cold winters, she says and smiles, after just having had experienced a hot summer.

Four weeks ago, she came empty-handed to Erik-Andersgården with the task of pursuing her creative idea: to interweave the Hälsinge farms in an interesting way with Namibia’s first world heritage site Twyfelfontein, which means the doubtful spring in Afrikaans, as there is not always water.

– From the beginning, I thought I would do something inside the house at Erik-Andersgården, but the ideas did not work completely, says Imke Rust.

And she is not an artist who works conventionally, strategically and goal-oriented. One of her watchwords is “trust the process”. Usually many small things must happen before the big thing falls into place.

“I had a vague idea, but I was also clear that I am open to the creative process to happen. The places and the material tell me what to do next. It’s like a dialogue. Communicating with the places and the objects and asking how they want to get together”, she says.

She prefers to call herself a multimedia artist. Which means that she uses what is available to take the creation forward.

“I love working like this, to just listen and feel and accept the process. In a way. But it can also be frustrating. As a person, I am really structured as well and like to have a plan for what to do. There may be some conflict …

– And of course I can feel stressed when I have a limited time of four weeks and I have received a scholarship where there are expectations. It can feel a little strange when people come and ask: How are you, what are you doing? And one can only answer: I do not know yet. But I have realized that this is how I work, she says.

But what began with empty hands and an empty sheet has now resulted in an art installation. A walk in the meadows around the farms in Söderala has now ended in a small abandoned cottage a few steps from Erik-Andersgården, which has been given new life.

It with the help of old objects found in the cottage and with new elements of paintings from Twyfelfontein.

– The first thought is of course that there are totally different places from completely different parts of the world. But people have always decorated and used art to communicate and tell things. It does not matter if it was 5,000 years ago in Africa or 300 years ago in Hälsingland. The need is the same, says Imke Rust.

She describes the rock engravings in Twyfelfontein as a way to create an alternative reality. Something that has also been common in Hälsingland.

– Even in the Hälsinge farms, people painted and tried to imitate precious materials such as marble. To make it look more glamorous and finer than it really was.

The tiny cottage was abandoned and full of dust and debris, but also contained a wood stove, wooden chair and some other small items have now been given an alternative reality.

The walls are now decorated with old pages from a telephone directory with exotic painted animals similar to those in Twyfelfontein and small rock carvings in miniature.

– It was only in the last few days that everything came together. I have not really been able to show anything before now.

And how does it feel to leave it behind you now and leave here?

– Exciting and a little sad. I have put so much energy into it. But I like working with things that are non-permanent. When I open the door and walk away, perhaps nature and the rain will destroy it over time. It is also an interesting process…

– If you look in here, you may not understand everything immediately. But your mind will surely create new stories. I hope you feel a bit like a curious child when you look around here, says Imke Rust.

Johan Adeström for Söderhamns Kurieren, originally published in Swedish, translated via Google Translate.

Imke Rust receives the World Heritage Scholarship


(Text quoted from the original site of the The Decorated Farmhouses of Hälsingland.)

The Culture and Competence Board with Region Gävleborg has awarded the World Heritage Scholarship for 2021. It will go to artist Imke Rust, born in 1975 in Windhoek, Namibia, and now based in Oranienburg, Germany.

Imke Rust is an established artist and was educated at the University of South Africa, and other places. In her work she examines relationships between myth and reality, people and nature. She challenges common conceptions about what it’s like to be a person, and offers fresh perspectives. Imke Rust´s art is profoundly personal, and its aim is to create meaning through processes, narratives and materials, with a will to bridge gaps between cultures and continents, history and the present, and between people and nature.

It’s incredibly exciting that the World Heritage Scholarship has made its breakthrough this year, and that so many people from around the world have applied. With this year’s World Heritage Scholarship we are also connecting two fascinating world heritages on two continents through art. The very keynote of world heritage, says Magnus Svensson (C), Chairman of the Culture and Competence Board.

Motivation:

Farmers in Hälsingland built and decorated many beautiful farms during the mid-1800s. Thousands of years earlier, hunters and gatherers in Namibia meticulously decorated the surrounding landscape with rock carvings, showing scenes of animals, people and abstract patterns. This year’s World Heritage Scholarship holder, artist Imke Rust, grew up on a farm in Namibia, but has been living and working for some time in Oranienburg in Germany. She sees a direct link between the Hälsingegårdar World Heritage and Namibia’s first world heritage; Twyfelfontein.

Example of a Namibian rock painting scene

The World Heritage Scholarship has made a real breakthrough this year. 101 applications were submitted in total – 42 national and 59 international. They have come from 34 different countries: Indonesia, Italy, Germany, Egypt, Spain, India, France, Portugal, Namibia, USA, Syria, Algeria, the Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Bangladesh, Canada, Colombia, Austria, Finland, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Singapore, Mexico, Iceland, Hungary, Serbia, Cyprus, Nepal, Zambia, Greece, Poland, Iran, Japan and Sweden.

Find out more about the: Decorated Farmhouses of Hälsingland.

Example image of an interior of a decorated farm house. (Svenska: Jon-Lars, Image by Sanna.lonngren)
Example image of the Swedish farmhouses (Svenska: Gästgivars med den högra byggnaden. Author: Catasa)

When days become long and lonely – Free Film

Wenn die Tage lang und einsam werden – Land Art Film gucken (Deutsch weiter unten)

SubRosa by Imke Rust – Film Still

The times are crazy and many people around the world are asked to stay at home and avoid social contact. So we thought the time is perfect to finally make our documentary film An Infinite Scream freely accessible to everyone via the Internet.

Also, because the documentary and the artworks have a strong and inspiring message of encouragement to find ways of becoming actively involved in creating the changes we want to see.

And, the good part is that it is available in English and in German! 

You are welcome to share the link and we would love to hear your thoughts once you have watched it.

Please take care and stay healthy!

English:

Concerned about the ever-increasing uranium mining in Namibia a local artist sets out to give the Namib Desert a voice: An Infinite Scream

Thousands of thorns arranged into traps in the blistering desert heat? Black rubbish bag roses planted between dunes or half a ton of salt poured into six huge circles?

Imke Rust’s land art installations not only show her concern about the extent of exploitation and pollution happening in the Namib Desert. They are also an attempt to symbolically protect the land and raising awareness about the effects of the ever-growing uranium mining industry.

Can art be an invocation for change?

Shot in 2012 in Namibia and Berlin, Holzkamp’s approach is determined by the nature and pace of Rust’s artworks. Meditative sequences documenting the making of the “Salt Circles” are followed by reportage style filming of the “The Scream”, an art action at the Atlantic coast.

When the local arts association unexpectedly rejects Rust’s exhibition, the film takes a dramaturgical turn and shifts the focus to the ensuing controversy about freedom of arts in Namibia. The well-known artist, with the help of a network of supporters, now finds alternative ways to ensure her works will be seen.

Strong imagery, breath-taking locations and atmospheric music weave the film into an impressive portrait of courage and initiative in a rather conservative society.

Filming on location in Namibia was supported in part by the National Arts Council of Namibia.

Title: An Infinite Scream
Documentary
English/German
45min
2012-13Produced on location in Namibia and Berlin.

Director & Producer: Steffen Holzkamp Filmmaker and musician based in Berlin.

Stills from the film.

Wenn die Tage lang und einsam werden…

Die Zeiten sind verrückt und viele Leute überall in der Welt sollen Zuhause bleiben und soziale Kontakte vermeiden. Also dachten wir uns, es ist die perfekte Zeit unseren Dokumentarfilm ‚An Infinite Scream’ für alle frei zugänglich im Internet zu veröffentlichen.

Auch weil der Film und die Kunst eine starke, inspirierende Botschaft haben, die uns ermutigt die Veränderungen die wir gerne in der Welt sehen wollen, aktiv und kreativ selbst mit zu gestalten.

Den Film gibt es in English (Original) und Deutsch (Overvoice).

Der Link kann gerne geteilt werden und wir freuen uns natürlich wenn ihr eure Gedanken zu dem Film mit uns teilt.

Bitte pass dich auf und bleib gesund!

Deutsch:

Ein Dokumentar Film von Steffen Holzkamp

Synopsis:

In der prallen Wüstensonne über 1000 Weißdornen zu Kreisen legen? Schwarze Müllsackrosen in die Sanddünen pflanzen? Oder eine halbe Tonne Salz zu einer begehbaren Skulptur formen?

Die Landart Installationen der Namibischen Künstlerin Imke Rust folgen einem immanenten Anliegen: Der Sorge über den zunehmenden Uranabbau in Namibia und der Verschandelung der Wüste. Ihre Kunstwerke sorgen für Aufmerksamkeit, verstehen sich aber auch als ein symbolischer Schutz für das geschundene Land.

Kann Kunst etwas bewirken? Was kann ich tun? Mit diesen Fragen beschäftigt sich Imke Rust auf eindringliche Weise.

In 2012 in Namibia und Berlin gedreht, spiegelt der Film die teils meditative Stimmung der Entstehung von Rust’s Landart. Ruhige Einstellungen bei der Installation der „Salt Circles“ oder reportagige Handkamera bei der Videoperformance „The Scream“ auf der Seebrücke am Atlankik: Schnitt und Montage folgen dem Tempo der Kunst.

Die Absage der gebuchten Rust-Ausstellung seitens der Kunstvereinigung bringt dem Film eine dramaturgische Wendung und verlagert den Schwerpunkt hin zu einer gesellschaftlichen und medialen Kontroverse über die „Freiheit der Kunst“ in Namibia.

So organisiert sich die bekannte Künstlerin mit Hilfe durch ein Netzwerk von Unterstützern ihre Ausstellung einfach selbst.

Starke Bilder an atemberaubenden Orten, sowie Illustrationen und Musik verdichten den Film zu einem eindrucksvollen Statement für Courage und Eigeninitiative im eher konservativen Namibia.

Die Filmarbeit in Namibia wurde teilweise vom National Arts Council of Namibia unterstützt.
Originaltitel: An Infinite Scream
Trailer: aninfinitescream.wordpress.com
Produktionsland: Namibia / Deutschland
Produktionsjahr: 2012 – 2013
Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
Spieldauer: 45 Minuten
Genre: Kunst/Kultur/Musik & Portrait
Regie & Kamera: Steffen Holzkamp / ONEXA-AV

Lost City (Site-responsive artwork at the Rössing Mountain)

Lost City (Site-Responsive artwork)

Start where you are and with what you have…

I love to go out and create art with only the things the site offeres to me. No special tools, no extra material – just responding to the site and conditions I find.

When we went to explore the barren Rössing mountain I found some building rubble. To my surprise it even had some colour on it… And so this work was created with the generous and unexpected colourful offerings of the Rössing mountain.

It was really hot, as usual, in the desert. The pieces of rubble were rough, heavy and hot. And many were full of sand, which needed to be removed to show the colour. At several times I thought “Ok, that’s it, that’s enough… I am done, let’s go rather home.”.

I should have brought some gloves… – somehow I never do, and if I do, I hate wearing them. And we should have come here closer to the sun-setting, when it has cooled down – I am not sure why I forgot about this essential point?

In the end there were more and more colourful pieces which I just had to add. My hands were blistered ands scratched, but I was happy and grateful for these fragments of colour in an otherwise pretty desolate surrounding.

Here is a short video, where you can see it all happening:

And once again, I cannot tell you how cool it is that my husband enjoys joining me in my art outings and filming the process. Now that he also owns a small drone, there is another cool perspective in his short videos. This one is a bit longer (2:50min) but the landscape is so breathtaking and unique, that I think you will not mind watching it till the end. His video work and audio is a beautiful artwork in its own right.

Between all the rubble I found one piece of broken, delicate china. Although it did not really fit with the rest, I just had to give it a space in this abstract city.

I hope you enjoy these images and the video as much as I do!

My Art in the Iwalewahaus Collection

I am so excited to share this news with you!! (Deutscher Text weiter unten)

The Iwalewahaus from the University of Bayreuth has acquired two art series from me.  The Iwalewahaus has a great collection of modern and contemporary visual art and popular culture from Africa, Asia and the Pacific regions, which is unrivalled in Germany.

I feel immensely honoured and very happy that my works will become part of this unique publicly accessible collection.

Both works are about the Namibian colonial history and how we are dealing with it today.

The Horse is a Problem. The Horse Must Go. Imke Rust, 6 sheets, Acrylic on green paper, 60x50cm each

‚The Horse is a Problem. The Horse Must Go.’ Consists of six works (Acrylic on green paper, 60 x 50cm each) which relate to the equestrian monument from colonial times, as well as the new statue of an unknown soldier erected on Heroe’s Acre by Koreans. The title derives from a speech made by former president Pohamba.

While the German-speaking Namibians speak of the Reiter (Rider), English-speakers usually refer to the Horse, when they speak about the equestrian monument. This difference in interpretation and naming is interesting, as it shows our differences in perception and thinking. Both, horse and rider, form a part of something bigger, which again is symbolic of something else. Some people want to save the rider others see the horse as the root of the problem. As long as we are not prepared to call the problems by their real names, acknowledge all parts and search for a joint solution it will be a challenge and we will fight about something very superficial.

Added to that, is the fact that the modern statues are no less problematic. Statues which were build after independence to unify the nation and celebrate more recent heroes of the independence struggle have been ordered from an Asian catalogue and installed by the North-Koreans. Hardly any Namibian can really identify with these statues, especially since they look more Asian than Namibian.

Who Cares About the Horse? Imke Rust, Mixed Media on paper, 3 sheets, each 29 x 21cm

The second series which was bought is entitled: ‘Who Cares About the Horse?’.

It consists of three pages (mixed media on paper, 29 x 21cm each). In 2008, South African artist William Kentridge showed the video artwork ‘I am not me, the horse is not mine.’ The title speaks of the denial of guilt and this has inspired my series of works. Each page shows an image from the German colonial times in Namibia. The first page shows a young Herero boy with a horse and the typed text ‘I am me. The horse is not mine.’ The second page shows a German officer on his horse and the text ‘I am me. The horse is mine.’ The third page shows a Herero man on a riding ox and the text ‘I am me. Who cares about the horse?’

This light-hearted work reminds us, to be stand by who we are, acknowledge the guilt we all carry and then we can find alternative, peaceful solutions which make the question about the ‘horse’ redundant.

Ich freue mich, diese Neuigkeiten teilen zu können – Deutsch

Das Iwalewahaus der Universität von Bayreuth hat zwei meiner Arbeitsserien für ihre Sammlung angekauft. Das Iwalewahaus verfügt über eine in Deutschland einzigartige Sammlung moderner und zeitgenössischer bildender Kunst und populärer Kultur aus Afrika, Asien und dem pazifischen Raum.

Es ist für mich eine große Ehre und eine besondere Freude, das meine Arbeiten nun in dieser einzigartigen Sammlung öffentlich zugänglich sein werden.

Die beiden Arbeiten befassen sich mit der namibischen Kolonialgeschichte und unseren heutigen Umgang mit ihr.

Detail: Reiter, denk mal

‚The Horse is a Problem. The Horse Must Go.’ Besteht aus sechs Blättern (Acrylic auf grünem Papier, je 60 x 50cm) die sich mit dem Umgang mit dem Reiterdenkmal aus der Kolonialzeit, aber auch der Statue des unbekannten Soldaten die von Nordkorea auf dem Heldenacker errichtet wurde, befassen. Der Titel ist von einer Aussage des ehemaligen Präsidenten Pohamba abgeleitet.

Während die Deutschen vom Reiterdenkmal reden, wird von Anderssprachigen meist nur von dem Pferd geredet. Schon in diesen unterschiedlichen Interpretationen von einer Sache sehe ich interessante Andeutungen, wie unterschiedlich wir denken und die Situation wahrnehmen. Beides, Pferd und Reiter, sind Teil eines Ganzen und Sinnbild für etwas anderes. Die einen wollen den Reiter erhalten, die anderen sehen das Pferd als Problem. Solange wir nicht bereit sind die eigentlichen Probleme beim Namen zu nennen, alle ihre Teile anzuerkennen und dafür gemeinsam Lösungen zu finden, ist es schwierig und wir streiten uns sehr emotional um Oberflächliches.

Dazu kommt, das die neuen Denkmäler oft nicht weniger zwiespältig zu deuten sind. Denkmäler die nach der Unabhängigkeit die Bevölkerung vereinen sollen und die Helden des Unabhänigkeitskampfes feiern, wurden aus einem Nordkoreanischem Katalog bestellt und auch von ihnen angefertigt. Identitätsstiftend wirken sie kaum auf irgendeinen ein Namibier, zumal sie meist ehr asiatische Gesichtszüge aufweisen als namibische.  

Die zweite Arbeitsserie die angekauft wurde heißt: ‚Who Cares About the Horse?’ und besteht aus drei Blättern (Mischtechnik auf Papier, je 29 x 21cm).

In 2008 zeigte der Südafrikanische Künstler William Kentridge eine Videoarbeit ‚I am not me, the horse is not mine.’ Der Titel, der von einer Schuldabweisung spricht, hat diese Serie inspiriert. Auf jedem Blatt ist ein Bild aus der deutschen Kolonialzeit zu sehen. Auf dem ersten ist ein Herero Junge mit einem Pferd zu sehen, dazu der Text: ‚I am me. The Horse is not mine’. Das zweite zeigt einen Schutztruppler, hoch zu Ross, dazu der Text ‚I am me. The horse is mine.’ Das dritte Bild zeigt einen Herero auf einem Reitochsen mit dem Text ‚I am me. Who cares about the horse?’

Diese Arbeit soll auf eine lustige Weise daran erinnern, das wir alle ehrlich dazu stehen sollten wer sie sind und welche Schuld wir alle tragen. Dann wäre es vielleicht einfacher uns auf alternative Lösungen zu konzentrieren und die die Frage nach dem ‚Pferd’ überflüssig machen.  

Ich höre den Schakal – Two Person Exhibition in Dachau 4 July

Katrin Schürmann and Imke Rust
will be exhibiting
at the Galerie der KVD in Dachau.
Opening on the 4th of July @ 19h30

Save the date! And please share with your friends in the area!


Hope to see you there! 😃 Ich freue mich euch dort zu sehen!

About the exhibition: (für den deutschen Text, bitte runter – scrollen)

Katrin Schürmann (1944) and me (1975) have a very interesting connection: we both grew up on the same farm in Namibia and we went to the same school in Swakopmund. We both are artists and both are now living in Germany.

Having met in 2017 at my exhibition in Munich we have kept in contact via email and exchanged memories and thoughts about the farm and our connection. Katrin Schürmann soon invited me to join her in an exhibition exploring this unique connection that we have.

After her studies Katrin Schürmann left Namibia to work in Germany and stayed ever since. In 1984 her mother sold their family farm Otukarru to my parents. So, just like Katrin, I spent a big part of my youth on the farm. Since my family is still farming there, I am also visiting as often as I can.

How do two artists of different generations relate to the same piece of land? How do the perspectives differ because of time,  memory and physical and emotional distance? Where do the perceptions differ? Where are they similar. How do the artists each deal not only with their personal histories, but also the colonial history? Especially in the current times, when it is important to critically question the history of land ownership in Namibia.

Both artists feel a strong connection to nature and Namibia’s vast spaces, the desert and the bush. Katrin works with abstract minimalism. Her monotypes and installations reflect the the barrenness of the land.

I am showing mixed media works, drawings and video works, which are mostly abstract figurative and explore my direct relation to the farm which I still call home. I am questioning the idealisation of and my ambivalent feeling towards the farm life. Current happenings, such as the drought, poaching incidents and the political call for land expropriation of white farmers, affect me directly and are expressed in my works.

Imke Rust ‘Rinderpest’ Mixed Media on paper, 68 x 82cm

Deutsch:

Wer entsinnt sich nicht an den Satz, der am Anfang des Romans von Tanya Blixen und einem sehr erfolgreichen Film steht: „Ich hatte eine Farm in Afrika“. Diese Aussage trifft auch auf die beiden Ausstellerinnen zu. Er prägte ihre Jugend.

Es ist nicht nur die Kindheit in Afrika, die Katrin Schürmann (1944) und Imke Rust (1975) verbindet – sie wuchsen auf derselben Farm in Namibia auf, gingen zur selben Schule in einem 300 Kilometer entfernten Dorf an der Küste, mitten in der Wüste. Dies alles stellte sich heraus, als sich die beiden Frauen zum ersten Mal trafen anlässlich einer Ausstellung von Imke Rust 2017 in der Pasinger Fabrik in München. Die beiden gehören verschiedenen Generationen an, die eine lebt heutzutage in Berlin, die andere in München.

Gemeinsam ist den beiden Künstlerinnen sicherlich die Liebe zur Natur, zu den endlosen Weiten der afrikanischen Savanne und der Wüste. Dieses drückt sich in der Arbeiten von Katrin Schürmann eher in minimalistischen, reduzierten Abstraktionen aus. Die Kargheit des Landes spiegelt sich in einfachen und direkten Darstellungen (Monotypien und Installationen) wider.

Ganz anders sind die Arbeiten von Imke Rust einzuordnen. Die gebürtige Namibierin, die erst vor kurzem nach Deutschland kam, weist auf politische Entwicklungen hin, bringt eine zwiespältige Reflektion zum Ausdruck, denn beide Künstlerinnen müssen sich heutzutage fragen, unter welchen Umständen diese Farm zur Kolonialzeit in Deutschen Besitz kam.

Imke Rust ist regelmäßig in ihrer Heimat und auf der elterlichen Farm. Somit ist sie immer wieder mit den aktuellen Geschehnissen dort konfrontiert. Ob Trockenheit, Wilderei oder die Forderungen nach Landenteignungen weißer Farmer – vieles berührt sie direkt und spiegelt sich in ihren Werken wieder

Imke Rust zeigt Arbeiten die auf der elterlichen Farm in Namibia entstanden sind oder in direkter Beziehung dazu stehen. Sie arbeitet multimedial und vorzugsweise direkt in der Natur, welches sie in Fotografien, Zeichnungen und Videoarbeiten dokumentiert und zeigt.

Für die geplante Ausstellung befassen sich beide Künstlerinnen mit ihrer Beziehung zu dem Land Namibia, aber auch dem Stückchen Land auf dem beide aufgewachsen sind und das für sie lange ihr Zuhause war. Wie sehen sie ihre persönliche Beziehung zu dem Land und seiner Geschichte? Welche Ähnlichkeiten und Unterschiede gibt es in der Wahrnehmung? Gerade in der jetzigen Zeit, wo Deutschland von den Herero zur Verantwortung für ihre koloniale Geschichte gezogen wird, ist eine kritische und persönliche Hinterfragung was es denn bedeutet „eine Farm in Afrika gehabt zu haben?“ spannend und wesentlich.

Mehr Information zu / More information about Katrin Schürmann:  http://www.katrinschuermann.de

Katrin Schürmann Monotypes 100 x 70cm

 

 

Upcoming: Zusammen Wachsen – group exhibition in Berlin!

BERLIN!!! (for english, please scroll down)

Zusammen Wachsen – Perspektiven namibischer Kunst

Das Projekt wird in Zusammenarbeit der kommunalen Galerie und der Deutsch-Namibischen Gesellschaft e. V. (DNG) realisiert. Einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit werden die namibischen Künstler*innen Imke Rust, Kirsten Wechslberger, Shiya Karuseb sowie Xenia Ivanoff-Erb vorgestellt und deren zeitgenössische Arbeiten präsentiert. Die ausgestellten Werke reichen von Malerei und Zeichnung über Mixedmedia und Grafik bis hin zu Fotografie und dreidimensionalen Objekten. Das gemeinsam gewählte Thema ZUSAMMEN WACHSEN ist verbindendes Element. Zugleich wird es aber auch sehr unterschiedliche interpretiert und gedeutet.

Alle Künstler werden anwesend sein. Wir freuen uns, euch zur Eröffnung persönlich willkommen heissen zu können.

Eröffnung: 28 Juni 2019 um 19.00 Uhr

Es laden ein: Michael Grunst, Bezirksbürgermeister, Dr Catrin Gocksch, Fachbereichsleiterin Kunst und Kultur und Katrin Krüger, Leiterin des Kulturhauses Karlshorst.

Begrüßung: Jürgen Becker, Kurator der Ausstellung und Mitglied im Vorstand der DNG
Eröffnungsrede: Egon Kochanke, Botschafter a.D.

Ausstellungszeitraum: 29. Juni bis 25. August 2019

Info über mich und meine Werke die gezeigt werden:

Imke Rust, geboren 1975 in Windhoek, lebt in Oranienburg bei Berlin und Swakopmund in Namibia.  Ich bin eine namibisch-deutsche Land Art und multimediale Künstlerin, aufgewachsen in der Wüste Namibias. Seit einigen Jahren pendele ich zwischen meiner Heimat und Deutschland, zwischen Wüste und Wald.   In meinen Arbeiten befasse ich mich mit Fragen meiner eigenen Identität und Migration, Verwurzelung, Entwurzelung und Anpassung. Als namibische Nachfahrin deutscher Auswanderer in 5ter Generation versuche ich nun in meiner neuen Wahlheimat Oberhavel nahe Berlin neue Wurzeln zu schlagen.   Geprägt vom dornigen Buschland und der kargen, trockenen Wüste verspüre ich eine besondere Nähe zur Natur. Welche Wurzeln muss ich kappen, welche neuen Äste oder Stämme wachsen lassen um hier im moosbedeckten Wald zu überleben? Was will und kann zusammen wachsen und neu entstehen? Wie ändern sich Form und Identität in diesem neuen Umfeld?   An der Universität von Südafrika absolvierte ich den ‚BA Degree in Visual Art’ und bin zweimalige Gewinnerin des wichtigsten Kunstpreis Namibias, der Standard Bank Namibia Biennale. In zahlreichen Solo und Gruppenausstellungen wurden Arbeiten von mir weltweit ausgestellt. Über ein Stipendium des Deutschen Akademischen Austauschdienstes (DAAD) kam ich 2006 das erste Mal nach Berlin.

Imke Rust, geboren 1975 in Windhoek, lebt in Oranienburg bei Berlin und Swakopmund in Namibia. Ich bin eine namibisch-deutsche Land Art und multimediale Künstlerin, aufgewachsen in der Wüste Namibias. Seit einigen Jahren pendele ich zwischen meiner Heimat und Deutschland, zwischen Wüste und Wald. In meinen Arbeiten befasse ich mich mit Fragen meiner eigenen Identität und Migration, Verwurzelung, Entwurzelung und Anpassung. Als namibische Nachfahrin deutscher Auswanderer in 5ter Generation versuche ich nun in meiner neuen Wahlheimat Oberhavel nahe Berlin neue Wurzeln zu schlagen. Geprägt vom dornigen Buschland und der kargen, trockenen Wüste verspüre ich eine besondere Nähe zur Natur. Welche Wurzeln muss ich kappen, welche neuen Äste oder Stämme wachsen lassen um hier im moosbedeckten Wald zu überleben? Was will und kann zusammen wachsen und neu entstehen? Wie ändern sich Form und Identität in diesem neuen Umfeld? An der Universität von Südafrika absolvierte ich den ‚BA Degree in Visual Art’ und bin zweimalige Gewinnerin des wichtigsten Kunstpreis Namibias, der Standard Bank Namibia Biennale. In zahlreichen Solo und Gruppenausstellungen wurden Arbeiten von mir weltweit ausgestellt. Über ein Stipendium des Deutschen Akademischen Austauschdienstes (DAAD) kam ich 2006 das erste Mal nach Berlin.

English:

Save the date! 28th of June we celebrate the opening of our group exhibition ‘Zusammen Wachsen’ at the Kulturhaus Karlshorst.

4 Namibian artists are presenting new and exciting art. I am honoured to show my works alongside my esteemed fellow artists: Shiya Karuseb, Kirsten Wechslberger and Xenia Ivanoff-Erb.

The project is organized by the Deutsch-Namibische Gesellschaft e. V. (DNG) together with the communal gallery Kulturhaus Karlshorst, to present contemporary Namibian art by the four artists. The selected works range from mixedmedia works, different printing techniques and photography to installations.

The subject ‘Growing Together’ was choosen by the group of artists. While this theme is the red thread through the exhibition, each artist has created their personal and unique interpretation thereof.

Come and join us for the opening! I am looking forward to connecting with you in person.

Opening: 28 June 2019 at 19:00

You are invited by: Michael Grunst, Bezirksbürgermeister, Dr Catrin Gocksch, Fachbereichsleiterin Kunst und Kultur und Katrin Krüger, Leiterin des Kulturhauses Karlshorst.

Welcoming words by  Jürgen Becker, curator of the exhibition and member of the board of the DNG
Opening speech by: Egon Kochanke, Botschafter a.D.

Duration of the exhibition: 29. Juni bis 25. August 2019

Curious about what works I will be showing?

I am presenting a brand-new series of mixed-media works. Through them I explore questions of my identity, migration, growing new roots, rootedness and being up-rooted.  As a 5th generation descendant of German colonial immigrants to Namibia, I have now choosen to create a new home for myself in Oberhavel county, just north of Berlin.

Having grown up in a thorny Namibian bush and dry, barren desert landscape I have always been very connected to the nature around me. Now I have to cut my roots and grow in new ways to survive and adapt to the moss-covered forests of my new home. How do the physical, natural surroundings shape and influence one’s identity?

Come and have a look at my take on it. And what all the other artist have created to the theme of growing together.

(Graphic Design of the first two immages by Xenia Ivanoff-Erb)

 

Studio Sale Windhoek

Dear Namibian friends, collectors and art lovers,

This is your chance to own that special artwork of mine.

I will be holding a studio sale this weekend at my Windhoek studio!! I am sorry it is at such short notice, but hope you can make it anyway.

If you are interested in my art, this will be a good opportunity to buy some of my (mostly) older works for good prices. There are big and small works, on paper, on canvas, on board… something for every taste and price. You might even find that last minute Christmas present for yourself or someone special.

I will be moving out of my Windhoek home/studio. By buying some of my art you will help me raise to raise some funds for the move and lighten the load of art that needs to be moved and stored 🙂

There will also be some art books, catalogues and magazines for sale.

When: Saturday and Sunday 15th and 16th of December, 2pm to 6pm
Where: My studio in Klein Windhoek (please contact me to get the address)

Please RSVP if you are interested to come. If you cannot make it on those two afternoons, contact me to see if we can arrange another time during the week or later.

You can reach me on my Namibian cell number: 081 703 1312

Please share this invitation with your friends – I have lost many of my Namibian contacts and would appreciate your help.

I am looking forward to hopefully seeing you again!

Thank you and kind regards
Imke

Here are some of the available works, but there are many more….

9th International Forest Art Path Darmstadt

Art and Ecology – that is the theme of this year’s Forest Art Path (Waldkunstpfad) curated by Ute Ritschel and Sue Spaid.

Walking Along a Crack in a Rock, Performance documented as a photo collage (© Imke Rust, 2017)

I am very excited that I have been invited to install a site-specific land art installation for this event. The large-scale installation which I will be creating is entitled ‘Energy’. I will post progress pictures on my Instagram account and here if I find the time.

From next week on I will be in Darmstadt and creating alongside a wonderful group of 23  artists from 9 countries.

I thought I let you know, just in case you are in or close to Darmstadt and want to come and say Hi.

There are a few official dates where you can learn more about my art:

Wednesday, 25th of July, 20h00 I will be speaking at the Wednesday Forum Artist Talks at the International Forest Art Centre. Ludwigshöhstr. 137

Tuesday, 31st July, 20h00 I will be giving a presentation about the ‘Creative Secrets of Rainmaking’ at the International Forest Art Centre. Ludwigshöhstr. 137

And the official opening of the 9th International Forest Path will take place on Saturday, the 11th August 2018 at 15h00 at the Ludwigshöhturm.

Hope to see you there. But you are also welcome to contact me to arrange to meet me in the forest while I am working. (between the 23rd of July and the 10th of August).

Click HERE for the full program and details (PDF in German).

I will also be revisiting some of my old works, which I have created in this forest in 2017 during the Global Nomadic Art Project Germany – Urban Nature Art.

Bark Figure, Waldkunstpfad 2017, © Imke Rust

Here is a list of the other artists who are participating and whom you might like to meet too:

431art – Torsten Grosch und Haike Rausch (Germany)
Isabelle Aubry (France)
Emanuelle Camacci / Fulvio D’Orazio (Italy)
Rebecca Chesney (UK)
Mark and Beth Cooley (US)
Georg Dietzler (Germany)
Kim Goodwin (South Africa)
Joachim Jacob / Florian Schneider (Germany)
Daniela di Maro (Italy)
Anke Mellin (Germany)
Imke Rust (Germany/Namibia)
Noboyuko Suguhara (Japan)
Kevin Sullivan (USA)
Vera Thaens (Belgium)
Stefanie Welk / Bianca Bischer (Germany)
Susanne Resch / Christoph von Erffta (Germany)
IMD Projekt Julia Mihaly, Stockhausen Konzert

For further information please visit the official website of the organizers: https://2018.waldkunst.com/

“Fremde Welten” Finissage (Reminder)

(For English, please scroll down)

Exhibition view ‘Fremde Welten’ Imke Rust at the Orangerie, Oranienburg

Erinnerung: Finissage

Die Ausstellung ‚Fremde Welten’ der namibischen Künstlerin Imke Rust ist noch bis zum 5. April in der Orangerie zu besichtigen.

Am 5. April, um 18:30 Uhr lädt die Künstlerin alle Interessierten zur Finissage ein. Bei einem Glas Wein kann man die Arbeiten noch ein letztes Mal sehen und mit der Künstlerin ins Gespräch kommen. Um 19:15 wird noch ein 45 minütiger Dokumentarfilm über die ausgestellten Land Art Arbeiten gezeigt.

Der Film ‚An Infinite Scream’ dokumentiert mit wunderschönen Bildern und Eindrücken die Entstehung der Arbeiten, verfolgt aber auch die politischen Hintergründe und wirft Fragen über Kunstfreiheit, Zensur und den Stellenwert der Kunst in der Gesellschaft auf. Steffen Holzkamp, Filmemacher, Musiker und Ehemann der namibischen Künstlerin, wird auch anwesend sein und nach der Filmvorführung gemeinsam mit der Imke Rust Fragen zu dem Projekt und Film beantworten.

Der Film wird in deutscher Sprache gezeigt.
Weitere Infos zu dem Film und eine kurze Vorschau gibt es unter https://aninfinitescream.wordpress.com/

Synopsis:

In der prallen Wüstensonne über 1000 Weißdornen zu Kreisen legen? Schwarze Müllsackrosen in die Sanddünen pflanzen? Oder eine halbe Tonne Salz  zu einer begehbaren Skulptur formen?

Die Landart Installationen der Namibischen Künstlerin Imke Rust folgen einem immanenten Anliegen: Der Sorge über den zunehmenden Uranabbau in Namibia und der Verschandelung der Wüste. Ihre Kunstwerke sorgen für Aufmerksamkeit, verstehen sich aber auch als ein symbolischer Schutz für das geschundene Land.

Kann Kunst etwas bewirken? Was kann ich tun? Mit diesen Fragen beschäftigt sich Imke Rust auf eindringliche Weise.

In 2012 in Namibia und Berlin gedreht, spiegelt der Film die  teils meditative Stimmung der Entstehung von Rust’s Landart. Ruhige Einstellungen bei der Installation der „Salt Circles“ oder reportagige Handkamera bei der Videoperformance „The Scream“ auf der Seebrücke am Atlankik: Schnitt und Montage folgen dem Tempo der Kunst.

Die Absage der gebuchten Rust-Ausstellung seitens der Kunstvereinigung bringt dem Film eine dramaturgische Wendung und verlagert den Schwerpunkt hin zu einer gesellschaftlichen und medialen Kontroverse über die „Freiheit der Kunst“ in Namibia.

So organisiert sich die bekannte Künstlerin mit Hilfe durch ein Netzwerk von Unterstützern ihre Ausstellung einfach selbst.

Starke Bilder an atemberaubenden Orten, sowie Illustrationen und Musik verdichten den Film zu einem eindrucksvollen Statement für Courage und Eigeninitiative im eher konservativen Namibia.

Die Filmarbeit in Namibia wurde teilweise vom National Arts Council of Namibia unterstützt.

Alle Arbeiten stehen zum Verkauf. Dazu bietet sich die Chance bei der Finissage oder wenn sie nicht vor Ort sein können, melden sie sich bitte per Email bei mir.

Adresse: Orangerie, Kanalstraße 26a, 16515 Oranienburg

ENGLISH:
Reminder: Finissage

The Exhibition ‘Fremde Welten’ by Imke Rust can still be viewed at the Orangerie (Oranienburg) till the 5th of April 2018.

On the 5th of April, at 18h30 you furthermore have a the opportunity to join the artist for a glass wine at the Finissage, to view the works and meet the artist. At 19h15 a 45min documentary (in German) about the origin and process of Imke Rust’s land art works which are on the display will be shown.

The filmmaker and musician Steffen Holzkamp, who is also Rust’s husband, will be present and there is time for questions after the film.

The film ‘An Infinite Scream’ not only shows the artist’s effort to raise awareness of the increasing pollution and destruction through Uranium mining in the Namib Desert, but also raises questions about artistic freedom, censorship and the power of art.

You can find a trailer and more information about the film under https://aninfinitescream.wordpress.com/

Artworks are for sale, either at the Orangerie or through contacting me via email.