Author Archives: Imke Rust

About Imke Rust

Multi-Passionate Being & Investigative Creator (aka artist) Living, creating and playing in Berlin and Windhoek.

Rust imagines Twyfelfontein in Sweden

By Martha Mukaiwa for The Namibian Newspaper (copied here with kind permission)

and further down: an interview with Johan Adeström published in Söderhamns Kurieren (translated to English via the internet and copied here with kind permission.

Imke Rust in her art installation ‘Drawing Certainty from the Spring of Doubt’, at Erik-Anders Farm, Asta, Sweden

IN a once derelict hut in Sweden, award-winning multidisciplinary artist Imke Rust draws the spirit of Twyfelfontein across space and time.

Her installation which connects the decorated farmhouses of Hälsingland and the famed site of ancient rock engravings in northern Namibia was created for this year’s World Heritage Scholarship.

Rust was awarded the residency from a crop of 101 applicants from 34 countries and spent four weeks living and working at Sweden’s Hälsingegården Erik-Anders and Kristofers Farm.

The scholarship invited artists to connect the aspirational and elaborately hand-painted farmhouses of Hälsingland with another Unesco World Heritage site and Rust quickly saw a link with the rock engravings of Twyfelfontein, some of which, like ‘Lion Man’ and ‘Dancing Kudu’, are said to depict shamanic rituals and trances.

“Both sites are not ‘mere decorations’ but are intentional creative interventions, which allow us to transcend into an alternative reality,” she says.

Transforming the hut into a fairy tale-like space by painting wallpaper in the style of the decorated Hälsingland farms while referencing Twyfelfontein in images rendered akin to the famed rock engravings, Rust engaged in a highly intuitive process that combined found natural and man-made objects with retro telephone book pages which culminate in an installation she titled ‘Drawing Certainty from the Spring of Doubt’.

Though the installation is in Sweden and draws on Twyfelfontein, Rust maintains that neither becomes the other.

“The installation creates a room where both sites are in correspondence with each other, without imposing one on the other. Correspondence is an open-ended, dialogical process of unfolding and becoming,” she says.

To Rust, this straddling and correspondence between realities, cultures, time and space, provides a unique opportunity for learning and connection.

“Maybe a bit like eavesdropping on a conversation between the two sites and making up your own story from the elements you recognise and the ones which seem strange and unfamiliar. Or like stumbling into an unknown cave and finding more and more treasures as you look, but not fully understanding them.”

Honoured to have her installation supported and on show at the Erik-Anders World Heritage site which receives around 30 000 visitors per year, Rust left Sweden with the feeling of having highlighted our shared humanness.

“One of the central ideas of my art and installation is to show how humans are much more alike than different,” Rust says.

“We marvel at the ‘other’ and how exotic they are, but once we look a bit closer, we can realise that we all have the same needs, hopes and fears.”

Visit imkerust.com to explore the installation online.

–martha@namibian.com.na; Martha Mukaiwa on Facebook and Instagram; marthamukaiwa.com

See more images and info HERE.

Interview:

International artist weaves together world heritage from Africa and Hälsingland: “Feeling a bit like a curious child”

What do artistic elements in Hälsingland farms have in common with rock carvings from a world heritage site in Namibia?

“Quite a lot”, says the acclaimed Namibian artist Imke Rust, who for a month worked on an art project at Erik-Andersgården in Söderala.

This is the third time that the World Heritage Scholarship has been awarded by the Gävleborg Region. This year, the Namibian artist Imke Rust has received 5,000 euros to create art where two world heritage sites are linked: Twyfelfontein, an area with rock engravings in Namibia and Erik-Andersgården in Söderala.

This year, more than a hundred applications were received from 34 different countries, but the jury stuck to Imke Rust’s application.

She was born and raised in the Namibian capital Windhoek and has on two occasions received the country’s finest art award from the Namibian national art gallery. Nowadays she lives mostly in Germany.

The visit to Sweden is her first, and she did not know much about the country.

– I had an image that it is a well-ordered country far north, with cold winters, she says and smiles, after just having had experienced a hot summer.

Four weeks ago, she came empty-handed to Erik-Andersgården with the task of pursuing her creative idea: to interweave the Hälsinge farms in an interesting way with Namibia’s first world heritage site Twyfelfontein, which means the doubtful spring in Afrikaans, as there is not always water.

– From the beginning, I thought I would do something inside the house at Erik-Andersgården, but the ideas did not work completely, says Imke Rust.

And she is not an artist who works conventionally, strategically and goal-oriented. One of her watchwords is “trust the process”. Usually many small things must happen before the big thing falls into place.

“I had a vague idea, but I was also clear that I am open to the creative process to happen. The places and the material tell me what to do next. It’s like a dialogue. Communicating with the places and the objects and asking how they want to get together”, she says.

She prefers to call herself a multimedia artist. Which means that she uses what is available to take the creation forward.

“I love working like this, to just listen and feel and accept the process. In a way. But it can also be frustrating. As a person, I am really structured as well and like to have a plan for what to do. There may be some conflict …

– And of course I can feel stressed when I have a limited time of four weeks and I have received a scholarship where there are expectations. It can feel a little strange when people come and ask: How are you, what are you doing? And one can only answer: I do not know yet. But I have realized that this is how I work, she says.

But what began with empty hands and an empty sheet has now resulted in an art installation. A walk in the meadows around the farms in Söderala has now ended in a small abandoned cottage a few steps from Erik-Andersgården, which has been given new life.

It with the help of old objects found in the cottage and with new elements of paintings from Twyfelfontein.

– The first thought is of course that there are totally different places from completely different parts of the world. But people have always decorated and used art to communicate and tell things. It does not matter if it was 5,000 years ago in Africa or 300 years ago in Hälsingland. The need is the same, says Imke Rust.

She describes the rock engravings in Twyfelfontein as a way to create an alternative reality. Something that has also been common in Hälsingland.

– Even in the Hälsinge farms, people painted and tried to imitate precious materials such as marble. To make it look more glamorous and finer than it really was.

The tiny cottage was abandoned and full of dust and debris, but also contained a wood stove, wooden chair and some other small items have now been given an alternative reality.

The walls are now decorated with old pages from a telephone directory with exotic painted animals similar to those in Twyfelfontein and small rock carvings in miniature.

– It was only in the last few days that everything came together. I have not really been able to show anything before now.

And how does it feel to leave it behind you now and leave here?

– Exciting and a little sad. I have put so much energy into it. But I like working with things that are non-permanent. When I open the door and walk away, perhaps nature and the rain will destroy it over time. It is also an interesting process…

– If you look in here, you may not understand everything immediately. But your mind will surely create new stories. I hope you feel a bit like a curious child when you look around here, says Imke Rust.

Johan Adeström for Söderhamns Kurieren, originally published in Swedish, translated via Google Translate.

Offenes Atelier und Ausstellungen

Es ist viel passiert und viel geplant…
Gerne nutze ich die Gelegenheit euch einzuladen und zu informieren.

 
Gerade bin ich von meinem 4-wöchigem Welterbe Stipendium aus Schweden zurück gekommen und gleich geht es mit ein paar spannenden Events weiter zu denen ich euch einladen möchte!
Zu dem Welterbe Stipendium will ich in den nächsten Tagen noch einen ausführlicheren Post schreiben.


Tage des offenen Ateliers in Brandenburg:
Am 21. Und 22. August öffne ich wieder mein Atelier für Besucher, Sammler und solche die es noch werden möchten.

Unter anderem kann man einige meiner neuen Arbeiten aus Schweden sehen und ich erzähle gerne über meine ortsbezogene Installation und Erfahrungen dort.

Jeweils von 10-18Uhr
Birkenstr. 11, 16515 Oranienburg OT Neu-Friedrichsthal.

Gransee zeigt Gesicht


Am 28. August (12 – 16Uhr) eröffnet die Ausstellung
Gransee zeigt Gesicht
Marina Hillebrand | Reiko Kammer | Imke Rust


Die Ausstellung endet am 24. Oktober.
Ruppiner Strasse 61 · 16775 Gransee
Di bis Fr 10 – 16 Uhr · Sa und So 12 – 16 Uhr
Ein Projekt von KuNO e.V. 

L’andart21 – 4a Biennal Internacional d’Andorra


 

Als Teil des Künsterinnen Kollektiv ZAC (Zest Artist Collective) stelle ich noch bis zum 15. September 2021 bei der

L’andart21 – 4a Biennal Internacional d’Andorra
in Spanien eine Raum und Audio Installation ‘Nature’s Dance’ aus.

Weitere Informationen und Bilder: http://landartlexviral.com/project/zest-art-collective/

Kurse an der Volkshochschule Oberhavel



Bei der Volkshochschule Oberhavel startet das neue Semester und ab Ende August gibt es wieder einige Kurse von mir.
 
Zur Zeit gibt es in allen Kursen noch freie Plätze, aber aus Erfahrung werden sie dann doch schnell voll.
 
Hiermit also eine Erinnerung euch bald anzumelden, wenn ihr Lust habt wieder kreativ zu werden mit dem beliebten Art Journaling, der intuitiven Malerei, Kunst in der Natur, Leporellos oder Vision Boards gestalten oder zu lernen wie man eine Instagram Seite gestaltet und vermarktet.
 
Ich freue mich auf neue Teilnehmer*innen, und natürlich genauso sehr auf bekannte Gesichter!

Informationen zu den Kursen und Daten findet ihr auf der Seitei der VHS Oberhavel. 
Buchungen bitte auch über die VHS online, oder telefonisch unter 03301 601-5752

Imke Rust receives the World Heritage Scholarship


(Text quoted from the original site of the The Decorated Farmhouses of Hälsingland.)

The Culture and Competence Board with Region Gävleborg has awarded the World Heritage Scholarship for 2021. It will go to artist Imke Rust, born in 1975 in Windhoek, Namibia, and now based in Oranienburg, Germany.

Imke Rust is an established artist and was educated at the University of South Africa, and other places. In her work she examines relationships between myth and reality, people and nature. She challenges common conceptions about what it’s like to be a person, and offers fresh perspectives. Imke Rust´s art is profoundly personal, and its aim is to create meaning through processes, narratives and materials, with a will to bridge gaps between cultures and continents, history and the present, and between people and nature.

It’s incredibly exciting that the World Heritage Scholarship has made its breakthrough this year, and that so many people from around the world have applied. With this year’s World Heritage Scholarship we are also connecting two fascinating world heritages on two continents through art. The very keynote of world heritage, says Magnus Svensson (C), Chairman of the Culture and Competence Board.

Motivation:

Farmers in Hälsingland built and decorated many beautiful farms during the mid-1800s. Thousands of years earlier, hunters and gatherers in Namibia meticulously decorated the surrounding landscape with rock carvings, showing scenes of animals, people and abstract patterns. This year’s World Heritage Scholarship holder, artist Imke Rust, grew up on a farm in Namibia, but has been living and working for some time in Oranienburg in Germany. She sees a direct link between the Hälsingegårdar World Heritage and Namibia’s first world heritage; Twyfelfontein.

Example of a Namibian rock painting scene

The World Heritage Scholarship has made a real breakthrough this year. 101 applications were submitted in total – 42 national and 59 international. They have come from 34 different countries: Indonesia, Italy, Germany, Egypt, Spain, India, France, Portugal, Namibia, USA, Syria, Algeria, the Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Bangladesh, Canada, Colombia, Austria, Finland, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Singapore, Mexico, Iceland, Hungary, Serbia, Cyprus, Nepal, Zambia, Greece, Poland, Iran, Japan and Sweden.

Find out more about the: Decorated Farmhouses of Hälsingland.

Example image of an interior of a decorated farm house. (Svenska: Jon-Lars, Image by Sanna.lonngren)
Example image of the Swedish farmhouses (Svenska: Gästgivars med den högra byggnaden. Author: Catasa)

17. Brandenburgischer Kunstpreis (bis 30. August 2020)

Ich und meine Arbeit beim 17. Brandenburgischen Kunstpreis / Me and my work at the 17. Brandenburg Art Prize

Noch bis zum 30. August 2020 ist meine Arbeit Zusammenwachsen, bestehend aus 9 Mixed Media Grafiken beim 17. Brandenburgischen Kunstpreis im Schloß Neuhardenberg zu sehen. (Und auch käuflich zu erwerben.)

Ich freue mich, das ich es in diesem Jahr geschafft habe, in die Ausstellung des bedeutendsten Kunstpreises in Brandenburg aufgenommen zu werden und gemeinsam mit vielen herausragenden Kollegen*innen auszustellen.

In der Serie beschäftige ich mich mit der Verbindung zwischen Mensch und Natur, und der Sehnsucht in einer neuen Heimat Wurzeln zu schlagen, während man gleichzeitig die Saat und Äste des Geburtslandes in sich trägt.

Zusammenwachsen, Linoldruck und Tinte auf Papier, 9 Blätter, je 20x20cm (Linocut and ink on paper, 9 sheets, each 20x20cm)

My work Zusammenwachsen can still be viewed till the 30th of August 2020 at the 17th Brandenburg Art Prize in Schloss Neuhardenberg. It is a graphic mixed media work, consisting of 9 sheets and it is for sale.

I am very excited that my work has been selected for this year’s exhibition of the most prestigious art prize in Brandenburg. It is an honour to exhibit with so many brilliant colleagues.

This series is about the relationship between humans and nature and the longing to grow roots in another country, while carrying the seeds and branches of your home country.

Klicke auf die Bilder in der Galerie um sie zu vergrößern / Click on the images in the gallery to see a larger version.

Während der Preisverleihung / During the prize-giving event:

Meine Arbeit wurde in einer ungewöhnlichen Art an prominenter Stelle präsentiert.

My work was showcased in an unusual, but prominent way.

Collaborative Art Project on Show in the Netherlands

Kunstwandeling EB | Art walk EB  
​MUSEUM SCHOKLAND 
26 Juli – 26 Oktober 2020

Kunstwandeling EB | Art walk EB  
​MUSEUM SCHOKLAND 
26 Juli - 26 Oktober 2020
(Poster)

Together with Karin van der Molen, Karen Macher, Lucia Loren, Elena Redaelli and Sally Kidall, I am currently exhibiting our collaborative artwork Cross Pollination at the art walk EB.

Cross Pollination
Six artists from 4 different continents bring their ideas together in this installation. The six women know each other from their international nomadic artist’s existence, which suddenly came to a halt due to the corona pandemic. Encounters and exchanges are an important source for transcending a low tide situation. The idea for a ‘message in a bottle’ project originated from an intensive exchange via digital channels. They sent seeds, plants, soil, bones and ashes from Namibia, Australia, Peru, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands, to represent a small collection of our worldwide ecological DNA. Long ago, the continents of the six women were originally linked  together and our soil, plants and ancestors share a similar yet very different DNA. Our continents remain connected by the oceans and the air, which share the global consequences of our existence. Cross-pollination is necessary to keep it liveable.

Installation view (Photo by Karin van der Molen)

About my contribution:

Over the past months the world has changed dramatically. Everybody had to adapt to a changed reality of lock-downs, closed borders and isolation. Life turned more digital and virtual, but at the same time many people became sensitive to essential needs and self-sustaining practices, remembering old, traditional ways of life.

This crisis has forced us to reconsider what is essential and important to us and find alternative ways of being.

Based on the idea of communicating through messages in a bottle, I am offering messages about the essence of life. They are preserved and sealed in isolation of the bottle and can travel safely through the oceans of the world. Together with the bottles of my fellow artists they form a database of knowledge, beauty and a symbolic starter-pack for a new future. 
 
I am interested in the connection between the physical and non-physical world. In my art I explore the relationships between myth and reality, in order to create meaning. 
​Therefore, my messages take the form of physical, mythical and soul essences. Three types of Namibian seeds (representing ancestors and beginnings, beauty & pain and nourishment); fertile ground from my home country Namibia, and soil from my current home in Germany; my hair, as an essence of myself; huge white thorns of the Camelthorn tree, as an essence of protection and a decayed leaf as a thought about death.

Please click on the image to read more about the contents of the bottles.

***********

Have a look at the group’s website and information about the contributions of my wonderful fellow artists from Peru, Spain, Australia, Italy and the Netherlands HERE.

.************

Visitors at the artwork. (Photo: Karin van der Molen)
Detail view: click on the image to find out more (Photo: Karin van der Molen)

Frauen Silhouetten – Gedenkort Waldbaulager KZ, Neubrandenburg

Public artwork by Imke Rust (commissioned)

Three of eight female silhouettes at the Waldbaulager Gedenkort

(Deutsch weiter unten)

Last year I have been commissioned by the RAA Mecklenburg-Vorpommern to create a public artwork to commemorate the plight of women who have been incarcerated in the Waldbau KZ satellite camp, close to Neubrandenburg.

This secret, underground camp has been established by the Nazi regime in 1943 to support production for the armaments industry. About 2000 female prisoners were stationed here and used as forced labour. The living conditions have been described as inhumane and horrible, and many women have died.

When I researched the history of this place, one small detail grabbed my attention: several combs or pieces of combs were found hidden here.  Ex-prisoners who described the conditions, shared, that they were not allowed to have combs in these camps. Being found with a comb could be punished with death. The women secretly made their own combs out of leftovers from the production materials and these were shared amongst them. Unfortunately the self-made combs were not helpful against the fleas – the big problem in the unhealthy living conditions. One lady was able to smuggle in a fine comb and one had to pay half a ration of bread for the use of this comb.

This story of the combs made me aware that the women, despite all their suffering, still had the will to try and create ways to make their lives a little better. Through my art I wanted to restore some of their dignity and also commemorate their strength. It was also important that visitors could relate to these women as fellow human beings on a very personal level.

Therefore my eight life-sized female figures, which have been installed in small groups at different places in the forest, seem to dissolve on one side into the shape of a broken comb.

The women stand proud and strong, while at the same time they fade into the background and are only clearly visible from a certain angle. Making us aware that history can be forgotten quickly, if we make no effort to remember.

A short documentary video by Steffen Holzkamp (2:17min, German with English subtitles)

Visitors at the first public event – I love how the “historic women” stand silently amongst the guests:

Some more impressions:

Deutsch:

Zur Installation der Frauen-Silhouetten am Gedenkort Waldbau

Die wenigen Fundstücke, die direkt auf die Frauen deuten, bestehen aus Resten von Kämmen. Durch die Kämme, die eingeschmuggelt oder vor Ort heimlich aus Produktionsmaterial hergestellt und versteckt werden mussten, haben die Frauen sich ein klein wenig ihrer Würde zurückerobert.

Mit dem Kunstwerk möchte ich den Frauen symbolisch die Achtung zukommen lassen,die sie damals nicht bekamen. Mein Wunsch ist es ihnen ein positives Andenken zu setzen, an dem man aber auch das durchgemachte Leid erkennt.

Angelehnt an die Fundstücke der oft zerbrochenen Kämme, die sich heute im Regionalmuseum befinden, stellen meine abstrakten Frauensilhouetteneine Verbindung zwischen Frauenkörper und Kamm her.

Diese etwa lebensgroßen, abstrakten Silhouetten erinnern an einfach erkennbare, weibliche (Ur)Figuren. Sie sind wie ein Kamm flach gehalten. Die Auflösung der Figur in die Zähne der Kämme deutet auf die Vergänglichkeit, das Leid und auch unsere verblichene Erinnerung an diese Frauen und ihr Schicksal hin.

Als erste Installation die am Waldbau Gedenkort errichtet wird sollen die Silhouetten neugierig machen und auch schon auf die Geschichte des Ortes hindeuten.

Weitere Information zu dem Ort finden sie HIER.

When days become long and lonely – Free Film

Wenn die Tage lang und einsam werden – Land Art Film gucken (Deutsch weiter unten)

SubRosa by Imke Rust – Film Still

The times are crazy and many people around the world are asked to stay at home and avoid social contact. So we thought the time is perfect to finally make our documentary film An Infinite Scream freely accessible to everyone via the Internet.

Also, because the documentary and the artworks have a strong and inspiring message of encouragement to find ways of becoming actively involved in creating the changes we want to see.

And, the good part is that it is available in English and in German! 

You are welcome to share the link and we would love to hear your thoughts once you have watched it.

Please take care and stay healthy!

English:

Concerned about the ever-increasing uranium mining in Namibia a local artist sets out to give the Namib Desert a voice: An Infinite Scream

Thousands of thorns arranged into traps in the blistering desert heat? Black rubbish bag roses planted between dunes or half a ton of salt poured into six huge circles?

Imke Rust’s land art installations not only show her concern about the extent of exploitation and pollution happening in the Namib Desert. They are also an attempt to symbolically protect the land and raising awareness about the effects of the ever-growing uranium mining industry.

Can art be an invocation for change?

Shot in 2012 in Namibia and Berlin, Holzkamp’s approach is determined by the nature and pace of Rust’s artworks. Meditative sequences documenting the making of the “Salt Circles” are followed by reportage style filming of the “The Scream”, an art action at the Atlantic coast.

When the local arts association unexpectedly rejects Rust’s exhibition, the film takes a dramaturgical turn and shifts the focus to the ensuing controversy about freedom of arts in Namibia. The well-known artist, with the help of a network of supporters, now finds alternative ways to ensure her works will be seen.

Strong imagery, breath-taking locations and atmospheric music weave the film into an impressive portrait of courage and initiative in a rather conservative society.

Filming on location in Namibia was supported in part by the National Arts Council of Namibia.

Title: An Infinite Scream
Documentary
English/German
45min
2012-13Produced on location in Namibia and Berlin.

Director & Producer: Steffen Holzkamp Filmmaker and musician based in Berlin.

Stills from the film.

Wenn die Tage lang und einsam werden…

Die Zeiten sind verrückt und viele Leute überall in der Welt sollen Zuhause bleiben und soziale Kontakte vermeiden. Also dachten wir uns, es ist die perfekte Zeit unseren Dokumentarfilm ‚An Infinite Scream’ für alle frei zugänglich im Internet zu veröffentlichen.

Auch weil der Film und die Kunst eine starke, inspirierende Botschaft haben, die uns ermutigt die Veränderungen die wir gerne in der Welt sehen wollen, aktiv und kreativ selbst mit zu gestalten.

Den Film gibt es in English (Original) und Deutsch (Overvoice).

Der Link kann gerne geteilt werden und wir freuen uns natürlich wenn ihr eure Gedanken zu dem Film mit uns teilt.

Bitte pass dich auf und bleib gesund!

Deutsch:

Ein Dokumentar Film von Steffen Holzkamp

Synopsis:

In der prallen Wüstensonne über 1000 Weißdornen zu Kreisen legen? Schwarze Müllsackrosen in die Sanddünen pflanzen? Oder eine halbe Tonne Salz zu einer begehbaren Skulptur formen?

Die Landart Installationen der Namibischen Künstlerin Imke Rust folgen einem immanenten Anliegen: Der Sorge über den zunehmenden Uranabbau in Namibia und der Verschandelung der Wüste. Ihre Kunstwerke sorgen für Aufmerksamkeit, verstehen sich aber auch als ein symbolischer Schutz für das geschundene Land.

Kann Kunst etwas bewirken? Was kann ich tun? Mit diesen Fragen beschäftigt sich Imke Rust auf eindringliche Weise.

In 2012 in Namibia und Berlin gedreht, spiegelt der Film die teils meditative Stimmung der Entstehung von Rust’s Landart. Ruhige Einstellungen bei der Installation der „Salt Circles“ oder reportagige Handkamera bei der Videoperformance „The Scream“ auf der Seebrücke am Atlankik: Schnitt und Montage folgen dem Tempo der Kunst.

Die Absage der gebuchten Rust-Ausstellung seitens der Kunstvereinigung bringt dem Film eine dramaturgische Wendung und verlagert den Schwerpunkt hin zu einer gesellschaftlichen und medialen Kontroverse über die „Freiheit der Kunst“ in Namibia.

So organisiert sich die bekannte Künstlerin mit Hilfe durch ein Netzwerk von Unterstützern ihre Ausstellung einfach selbst.

Starke Bilder an atemberaubenden Orten, sowie Illustrationen und Musik verdichten den Film zu einem eindrucksvollen Statement für Courage und Eigeninitiative im eher konservativen Namibia.

Die Filmarbeit in Namibia wurde teilweise vom National Arts Council of Namibia unterstützt.
Originaltitel: An Infinite Scream
Trailer: aninfinitescream.wordpress.com
Produktionsland: Namibia / Deutschland
Produktionsjahr: 2012 – 2013
Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
Spieldauer: 45 Minuten
Genre: Kunst/Kultur/Musik & Portrait
Regie & Kamera: Steffen Holzkamp / ONEXA-AV

Tea in the Forest – an interactive artwork

Tea in the Forest (Ongoing), Images from October 2017- February 2019

Tea in the Forest – an interactive artwork

In October 2017 I collected some porcelain shards in the forest and placed them in a small circle next to a small pathway. As I found more shards, I added them and changed the circle.

In my mind I called this work: “Tea in the Forest”, because there was a snout of a teapot among the shards. This small work was destroyed by the wild pigs every now and then, but everytime I walked past, I would fix the circle again.

I kept this circle going for more than a year, when I noticed that somebody else also added some extra shards to the circle. I was delighted.

Soon after that I got bored of the circle and added a rectangle. Then sombody placed a smiley face into the circle.

I loved, that there was somebody out there, creatively interacting with my little collection of shards.

At some stage I found some blue and and pink shards and added them. Now the fun started for real…

I am not sure anymore which changes I made and which were made by others from then on. Eventually I met an elderly couple from down the street at the artwork and they told me they made some of the changes. They were worried that I would be upset, when in fact I could assure them how much fun it was to know that others added and changed it too. Later I found out that another neighbour also made changes every now and then.

So now, everytime I walk into the forest I am curious to see if there might be a new arrangement. And whenever I can and feel like it, I also create something new out of it.

Today I met my neighbour in the forest, and she showed me two shards, one with a beautiful pattern. She told me that she got it from the lady down the road with the task to add it to the latest image…

This interactive artwork brings me so much joy! Every time I go there and find something new, I am happy like a child. Knowing that this small, little creative interaction has inspired others to also become creative and keep it going and exciting. Just look at all the ideas that they and I have already come up with, during our walks into the forest.

Click on the images in the gallery below, to be taken on a tour through the individual changes. The last image is from the 29th of February 2020. I will keep on updating this page, as and when there are more changes. At the end you can see an overview and the dates of each change.

Lost City (Site-responsive artwork at the Rössing Mountain)

Lost City (Site-Responsive artwork)

Start where you are and with what you have…

I love to go out and create art with only the things the site offeres to me. No special tools, no extra material – just responding to the site and conditions I find.

When we went to explore the barren Rössing mountain I found some building rubble. To my surprise it even had some colour on it… And so this work was created with the generous and unexpected colourful offerings of the Rössing mountain.

It was really hot, as usual, in the desert. The pieces of rubble were rough, heavy and hot. And many were full of sand, which needed to be removed to show the colour. At several times I thought “Ok, that’s it, that’s enough… I am done, let’s go rather home.”.

I should have brought some gloves… – somehow I never do, and if I do, I hate wearing them. And we should have come here closer to the sun-setting, when it has cooled down – I am not sure why I forgot about this essential point?

In the end there were more and more colourful pieces which I just had to add. My hands were blistered ands scratched, but I was happy and grateful for these fragments of colour in an otherwise pretty desolate surrounding.

Here is a short video, where you can see it all happening:

And once again, I cannot tell you how cool it is that my husband enjoys joining me in my art outings and filming the process. Now that he also owns a small drone, there is another cool perspective in his short videos. This one is a bit longer (2:50min) but the landscape is so breathtaking and unique, that I think you will not mind watching it till the end. His video work and audio is a beautiful artwork in its own right.

Between all the rubble I found one piece of broken, delicate china. Although it did not really fit with the rest, I just had to give it a space in this abstract city.

I hope you enjoy these images and the video as much as I do!

Sand Stone Shadow Waves (Namib Desert)

We have spent some time in Namibia and worked on some creative projects. It was lovely to be back in the desert. The desert feels like home to me. There is a special connection, which I just cannot put into words.

This is one of the first works I created in the Namib desert, in the dune belt south of Swakopmund.

Fortunatley my husband loves to join me in the desert and with my creative projects. He enjoys to document my process, and then editing it into beautiful little artvideos and composing the music for it. These videos bring a new dimension to my work. It also shows the beautiful landscape in a new perspective and puts my work in scale and relation to the surroundings.

Some more images:

Creative Encounters

And while working I had a lovely and curious visitor. This little guy hopped along very closely as I collected the stones without a sign of fear. He seemed to just enjoy the activity and maybe the company. I thought of offering him some water in the shade which the car gave (the only shade wide and far). He accepted and some time later another little friend came to join him. I just love these unexpected moments of deep connection with nature.