Tag Archives: Oshakati

Starting of by Looking Back

All the best wishes to my blog followers for the New Year! Thank you for your support in the past and I am looking forward to sharing my art and thoughts with you again in 2013.

Happy New Year Namib © Imke Rust

Happy New Year Namib © Imke Rust

Wow, 2012 has been a busy and exciting year! My latest solo-exhibition has just ended and I had such a great response to it, that I am deeply grateful and humbled. Thank you all who came, commented, sent good wishes or supported me in any other way. I am busy getting ready for another fabulous new year and preparing to soon update my webpage with new pictures and information on the past exhibition and other news. Till then, I leave you with a brief review of my most viewed blogs of the last year.

I love feedback and was excited to get some nice statistics about my webpage and blog from WordPress (where my page is hosted), and would like to share some of the highlights with you:

My webpage received about 8700 views in the past year. Visitors came from 99 countries!
Most visitors came from Namibia. Germany & The United States were not far behind.

You might want to re-read my three top blogs from the past year – the ones which have received the most views are:

 

Cat & thorn circle

Cat and thorn circle

1. Tokoloshe Trap (or How to Catch Creatures of the Night) This blog tells you more about the origins of one of the works (Tokoloshe Trap) on my latest exhibition “…and I sensed an infinite scream passing through the Namib”.

 

 

 

 

Clay Foot front view (IRust)

Clay Sculpture by Imke Rust (c) front view

2. The shoes you wear… and how they are connected to my art  This one is a fun post about a very old work of mine, but seems if you put the word ‘shoes’ in the header, you might get more hits… (This blog got 184 views in 2012)

 

 

 

 

 

Tate Kuru, a Tree and a Road

Tate Kuru, a Tree and a Road

3. Tate Kuru, a tree and a road – a story of courage and doing the right thing This post is an inspirational post and explains a bit of my thinking and background to the art project I worked on for most of the year which resulted in my solo exhibition “…and I sensed an infinite scream passing through the Namib” which was shown in December 2012  in Swakopmund to great acclaim.

 

 

 

I would love to hear which was your personal favourite blog post, story or artwork of mine of the past year? And is there anything that you really would love to read or see more about this year?  Please let me know!

Tate Kuru, a tree and a road – a story of courage and doing the right thing

Tate Kuru, a Tree and the road - Sketch

A little sketch I made to remember this awesome story

Some years ago I lived in Oshakati, a town in northern Namibia, which was/is a crazy mix between traditional Africa and urban shopping centers, absolute poverty and tremendous wealth, thousands of people and similar amounts of donkeys, goats and hungry dogs roaming the streets. Not really a pretty place, but interesting and alive.

The time there left a huge impression on me in many ways and left me with quite a few stories to tell. The memory of one story suddenly returned to me in vivid colours and stubbornly keeps sticking in my thoughts. I guess it is a good time to tell and share this story, as it is so inspiring. Here it goes:

One day we left Oshakati, driving north-west towards Ruacana with a friend. The surrounding area is pretty flat and the road at most places unimaginatively straight, except for one place. About 50km outside of Oshakati the straight road heads straight towards a gorgeous, huge tree. Shortly before the road meets the tree it makes a bend to the right and travels around it, just to take up its normal course shortly afterwards. I commented that I thought that was great of the engineers that they did not just chop down the tree in their way, but instead planned for the street to go around it. Our friend smiled and told us, that the engineers and road builders had no intention to do this, but planned to fell the tree. A ‘Tate Kuru’ (Ovambo for wise old man) – I assume from a nearby village – found out their plans and did not want this ancient, impressive tree to die to make place for the street. He pleaded with them, but the authorities were not interested and told him the tree has to go in the name of development.

The old man was not that easily impressed, so he went home, got his gun and sat under the tree, threatening to shoot anybody that tried to remove him or the tree. He sat there for a very long time, day and night, protecting the tree from the developers and nobody knew what to do with this stubborn and determined ‘Tate Kuru’. Eventually his perseverance of this one old chap won and amazingly the developers build the road around the tree. Unfortunately I do not know who this guy was… I would love to meet him and thank him.

I made a tiny little drawing to remind me of the responsibility and power we all have towards our environment.

The moral of the story?

If one old man can protect a tree from a tarred road and rich developers, so can you and me. We just need to remember what is really important and act accordingly. And remember this very special ‘Tate Kuru’ if you ever feel that you are all alone or not strong enough to make the world a better place.

You alone can make a difference, and if we join forces, we can make an even greater difference. And sometimes some bold actions and perseverance is needed.

IRust_Tree & road

Just to prove to you that this story is not made up, I have located the spot on Google satellite images and marked it for you. You can clearly see the road making a bend around the big dark tree.

If you want to know why this story is so important to me at the moment, read on:

I am really concerned about the future of our beautiful Namib Desert and coastal area around Swakopmund – just recently the Namibian Cabinet has agreed to sell 700 hectares of the Dorop National Park to a company who plans to build a huge industrial and chemical plant. Eventually they will need about 3000 hectares according to their plans, also all inside the recently established Dorop National Park. The same company (and some others) also has plans for marine phosphate mining along our coast and they have already acquired the respective EPLs (Exclusive Prospecting Licenses). In most parts of the world it is prohibited to mine marine phosphate which is highly radioactive and scientists do not know what impact the mining could have on the ecosystem and oceans. You can get much more detailed and scientific information about this on “The Earth Organization Namibia” blog.  

Have a look at some of the artworks which I have made for this cause here. And watch out for my exhibition in Swakopmund in December!

About a year ago a small group of concerned citizens has got together and are trying to spread information on this situation and the possible consequences and to protect our home from pollution and exploitation. They have formed several Facebook forums and they have also started a petition.

Please support this cause, by joining the Facebook groups, signing the petition and by getting informed and active in whatever way you can.

Link to the Petition: (just click on the links to be taken straight to the respective sites)

http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/the-ministers-of-environment-tourism-and-fisheries-marine-resources-listen-to-scientists-don-t-let-phosphate-mining-threaten-namibia-s-ocean

Facebook Pages:

Industrial Swakopmund?? What future do we want!

We Say NO to Gecko’s VIP Industrial zone near the Namib Coast

A good summary of some background information can be found at:

The Earth Organization Namibia” blog

Also:

Encourage your family, friends and contacts to send their e-mail addresses to the following e-mail address so that a comprehensive mailing list can be maintained and all those can be reached and kept informed about the environment of the Namibian coastline and its ocean:

swakopmundmatters@mtcmobile.com.na